La Valdichiana

La Valdichiana

Storie dal Territorio della Valdichiana

Tag: etruscan

Chianciano: ELECTRO CYCLE NIGHT con Davide Boosta Dileo

La Combo Produzioni presenta, nella serata di chiusura di ETRUSCAN, uno dei raduni nazionali più autorevoli di Groupcycling, ELECTRO CYCLE NIGHT with BOOSTA Davide “Boosta” Dileo, tastierista e co-fondatore dei…

La Combo Produzioni presenta, nella serata di chiusura di ETRUSCAN, uno dei raduni nazionali più autorevoli di Groupcycling, ELECTRO CYCLE NIGHT with BOOSTA

Davide “Boosta” Dileo, tastierista e co-fondatore dei Subsonica. Dj e remixer (Placebo, Skin, Client, Moby e unico in Italia per Depeche Mode). Un Produttore prolifico – recentemente al lavoro sull’album di Erica Mou – e ex direttore artistico al Salone del Libro per Bookstock è stato protagonista su SKY ARTE HD con il programma intitolato “Boo(k)sta: Libri in musica” dove racconta i suoi libri preferiti in modo originale, componendo ogni volta una colonna sonora inedita per ciascun libro.

L’universo musicale di Boosta è eterogeneo e costellato di progetti diversi: a partire dai meno recenti Iconoclash (Sony) nel 2004 (rivisitazione in chiave elettronica dei classici del glitter pop italiano degli anni ’80) e Caesar Palace (Universal), rock album del trio formato insieme a due componenti dei Linea77, proseguendo con numerose altre, tra cui vale la pena di ricordare la partecipazione a un volume di Paris Dernière, la celebre selezione “french touch” delle cover più cool realizzate nel mondo (Boosta è presente con la sua interpretazione di “Fly me to the Moon” di Frank Sinatra, scelta anche per il cd “best” al secondo posto in compagnia di Joey Ramone).

Davide Dileo è anche scrittore e questa attività l’ha portato sceneggiatura e regia del documentario “Surfin’ Torino”, in collaborazione con la regista Chiara Pacilli, prodotto da Rai Cinema. L’esperienza fortunata con Chiara Pacilli ha seguito nel 2011, con l’uscita di “Ho Visto Cose”, nuovo documentario sulla Torino Magica di cui Boosta cura tutte le musiche originali, oltre a offrirsi amichevolmente come interprete.

Insomma un artista multiforme, un’icona di riferimento nella scena della musica elettronica, Boosta ha suonato dietro ogni consolle d’Europa, da Ibiza a Zurigo passando per le più importanti situazioni elettroniche d’Italia e sabato 26 aprile, farà tappa a Chianciano, dove darà vita ad una serata piena di energia e poliedricità musicale.

Preview: Mathias Beat Dj – Opening: Dave_en & Paul Menzies [Tony House]
Closing: Pippo – Alex – Andrea G. [Area 51] – Fabien Pizar Dj

Sabato 26 Aprile 2014 – Sala Fellini c/o Parco Acquasanta di Chianciano Terme.
Ingresso in prevendita €10,00 [con drink] – Ingresso alla cassa €10,00 [senza drink]
Per info e prevendite: 328 9069686 – 328 9069373

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St. Stephen’s Parish Church in Cennano

Let’s continue our journey to discover the places and the most interesting events of the Valdichiana: today we will talk about Pieve di Santo Stefano (St. Stephen’s Parish Church) in…

Let’s continue our journey to discover the places and the most interesting events of the Valdichiana: today we will talk about Pieve di Santo Stefano (St. Stephen’s Parish Church) in Cennano, near Castelmuzio, within the municipality of Trequanda, which is part of the Diocese of Montepulciano, Chiusi and Pienza.

The Pieve di Santo Stefano in Cennano is a small piece of history of our region. This rural church, not so far away from the village, is the result of constant changes, adjustments and reconstructions, and each of these changes carries the memory of a bygone era. Architecturally, the Pieve di Santo Stefano in Cennano presents a simple gable façade, with a Gothic gate; the church has three naves, with apses characterized by a predominantly Romanesque style.

The church is a place of worship of the Catholic religion, and it was completed in 1285 A.D. and it was consecrated to St. Stephen, the first martyr of the Christian tradition. The small bell tower was erected in the 18th century. If you think this church, made of sandstone, has kept almost unchanged its structure, throughout the centuries, you might make a big mistake: its origins are even older.

The Pieve di Santo Stefano in Cennano was as an Etruscan Temple; the area around Castelmuzio, in fact, was an Etruscan settlement, whose traces of tombs, inscriptions and burial urns are still present. As Rome domination expanded, the Etruscan Temple left for another pagan temple, dedicated to the goddess Isis, built inside a vicus, a rural Roman settlement; the road that skirted it connected Chiusi to Fiesole.

On the foundations of the pagan temple was then built the Pieve of Santo Stefano in Cennano, around the 4th century; in the early Christian era, this baptismal church witnesses the progress of the Catholic religion in the countryside and in rural districts. Throughout the 7th and 8th centuries the church was very important, and was the reason for continuing disputes between the Bishops of Siena and Arezzo, who wanted to exercise their jurisdiction on the church, together with a group of churches and monasteries.

In the 14th century began the slow decline of the Pieve di Santo Stefano in Cennano, due to the gradual abandonment of the countryside and due to social changes. Thanks to the simplicity of its Romanesque style and the integrity of its structure, it has been restored since the 18th century. The first three bays of the nave were replaced by a gabled roof supported by pillars, and it was placed a Baroque altar and it was enriched with more modern works of art. Currently the church officiates the Holy Mass on Sunday, it hosts concerts of harpsichord and weddings, and it is accessible by tourists and pilgrims.

The particularity of the Pieve di Santo Stefano in Cennano is made by its vicissitudes, made of continuous reconstructions, which go hand in hand with cultural and social changes throughout the ages. A fate shared with many architectural works, maybe unknown or forgotten, but worthy of being told. An Etruscan settlement at first, then the Roman one, and then the early Christian one; it began a rural parish church, then it was abandoned, then it became again a restored place of worship. The dominant culture has always made changes to its structure. The old gods have been replaced, the architectures have been changed, the functions have been updated. Whenever the dominant culture came into contact with the Pieve di Santo Stefano in Cennano, it didn’t only admire it as a Museum: it has constantly molded it, revisited it, claimed it for itself and its symbols. The church has been forced to evolve in some ways: perhaps this is why it survived until this time, unlike many other buildings. And maybe this is just that feeling that you feel while visiting it: a tradition that constantly evolves and changes, even in a context that seems motionless and eternal, as the places of religious worship.

To sum up: the Pieve di Santo Stefano in Cennano is a wonderful and significant piece of history, lost in the territory of the Valdichiana. It’s not so visited by tourists, and perhaps it is also unknown to most of the local population, though it represents a perfect stop-over while trekking or for Sunday picnics. A visit is recommended to all lovers of sacred architecture and history facts, while we are waiting for the next dominant culture.

(photo credits by Edisonblus (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons)

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The village of Castelmuzio

Let’s continue our journey to discover the most interesting places of this territory, which can become a surprise and a destination for both tourists and residents of Valdichiana, which are…

Let’s continue our journey to discover the most interesting places of this territory, which can become a surprise and a destination for both tourists and residents of Valdichiana, which are chasing memories of the past. Our territory is rich in beautiful landscapes, villages and artworks, which have roots in history and they form a fixed point of reference for our future.

Among the most charming and interesting medieval villages that we can find within Valdichiana municipalities, there is definitely Castelmuzio, a part of the municipality of Trequanda. The origins of the village date back to the Etruscan Era, as proved by the discovery of the remains of a temple, dedicated to the Goddess Isis near the settlement, as well as tombs, urns and Etruscan inscriptions. To find official tracks of Castelmuzio, however, we must go beyond the year 1000 A.D.. In some documents of the 9th century of the Badia Amiatina of St. Salvatore (St. Salvatore’s Abbey), the place is called “Casale Mustia”, while it was called “Castello” (Castle) by its residents. In other documents, dating back to 1213 A.D., in the State Archive of Siena, it was appointed as “Castel-Mozzo“.

During the Middle Ages, Castelmuzio was owned by Messrs. Cacciaconti della Scialenga, former Lords of Montisi and owners of the farm of Fratta in Sinalunga. In 1270 A.D., the village passed to the Hospital of Santa Maria della Scala in Siena, whose coat of arms is still present in some farms in the surroundings; it was bought then by Andrea Piccolomini in 1470 A.D.; the domain broke in 1559 A.D. with the defeat of the Republic of Siena and it was annexed to the Grand Duchy of Tuscany, ruled by Medici. After the unification of Italy, Castelmuzio became definitively part of the municipality of Trequanda.

The hamlet of Castelmuzio was erected on the crest of a tuff hill, at the foot of Mount Lecceto. Its structure follows the model of the medieval fortified castle, surrounded by walls and ramparts to facilitate the defence of the inhabitants. At the entrance of the village, there is a monument to the fallen and the ancient stone on which St. Bernardino of Siena used to rest. Within the village, there are many notable historic buildings, such as Palazzo Fratini, which was the seat of the Court and the name of the place is probably due to this, to its cut off tower. On the main square there is the Spedale of St. John the Baptist as well, which used to offer accommodation and food to travellers and orphans, as well as provide a dowry for girls without assets, who wanted to get married. It’s worth mentioning also the Brotherhood of the Holy Trinity and St. Bernardino, founded in 1450 A.D., equipped with a small pharmacy and a hospice for pilgrims on the Via Francigena; the oratory and the Sienese church, dedicated to the Saint, host a Sacred Art Museum rich in valuable specimens.

Today Castelmuzio is a part of the comune of Trequanda, with less than 300 inhabitants. Situated near Petroio and Montisi, it is definitely a suggestive part of a visit through Valdorcia and Valdichiana and Val d’Asso.

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